The Cookie Machine - Click here to drag window

DUMMY TEXT - Real text set in assets/js/theCookieMachine.js

Views: 32,907β€…    Votes:  13β€…
Tags: fdisk   disk-management   loop-device  
Link: πŸ” See Original Answer on Ask Ubuntu πŸ”—

URL: https://askubuntu.com/q/1195398
Title: How to remove /dev/loops
ID: /2019/12/11/How-to-remove-_dev_loops
Created: December 11, 2019    Edited:  June 12, 2020
Upload: November 24, 2022    Layout:  post
TOC: false    Navigation:  false    Copy to clipboard:  false


Edit for sudo fdisk -l

The question was changed today so here is how you can remove the extra output without resorting to deleting all your snaps and being left without a calculator and what not:

sudo fdisk -l | sed -e '/Disk \/dev\/loop/,+5d'

As this can be hard to remember you could create an alias in your ~/.bashrc:

alias fdsk="sudo fdisk -l | sed -e '/Disk \/dev\/loop/,+5d'"

Then simply type fdsk in the command line and enter your password when prompted.


As mentioned in comments /dev/loop99 are snap file system images described here:

Assuming you don’t want to uninstall all your snaps, your next best option is to hide them from output by appending | grep -v ^/dev/loop. For example:

$ df | grep -v ^/dev/loop

Filesystem      1K-blocks      Used Available Use% Mounted on
udev              3978476         0   3978476   0% /dev
tmpfs              802400      1688    800712   1% /run
/dev/nvme0n1p6   46445360  33133368  11159560  75% /
tmpfs             4011984    227448   3784536   6% /dev/shm
tmpfs                5120         4      5116   1% /run/lock
tmpfs             4011984         0   4011984   0% /sys/fs/cgroup
/dev/nvme0n1p8    9485308   1890272   7595036  20% /mnt/e
/dev/nvme0n1p10  27937812  22501880   3993732  85% /mnt/clone
/dev/nvme0n1p7   23734708  19316220   3189796  86% /mnt/old
/dev/nvme0n1p4  380829660 169799196 211030464  45% /mnt/c
/dev/nvme0n1p2      97280     33222     64058  35% /boot/efi
/dev/sda3       963668988  43929712 919739276   5% /mnt/d
tmpfs              802400        60    802340   1% /run/user/1000
⇧ What should /etc/sudoers contain normally? How would you separate fields with multiple spaces and store them in an array?  β‡©